Android inherent tunnel disadvantage

Issues and ideas for the Android I2P app
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Bob
Posts: 5
Joined: 27 Jul 2018 01:55

Android inherent tunnel disadvantage

Post by Bob »

I am wondering, does the quality of other routers a device is tunneled to depend on the uptime and quality of your current router? So if you have a desktop that is always on will that router get connected to higher quality/bandwidth routers than say an Android mobile device which may connect and disconnect several times in a day?
echelon
Posts: 205
Joined: 10 Feb 2018 13:36

Re: Android inherent tunnel disadvantage

Post by echelon »

Hi

Yes and no.
I2P is self regulatoring. It takes known peers, try to connect to them, and if reachable, rate them based on speed, capacity and free connections.
Best ones are used for tunnel building.
if you know only overloaded nodes and 4 nodes with no load, but only 50 kb/sec traffic, those 4 nodes are the best ones and used for tunnels, e.g.

If you have a longer uptime, you do know more peers and have rated more of them and maybe can get better tunnels.
But if those are mostly under load, it does not help you much.

echelon
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Bob
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Joined: 27 Jul 2018 01:55

Re: Android inherent tunnel disadvantage

Post by Bob »

Thanks, makes sense. So on my primary Android device I will probably just keep the router off unless I need it so I am not suddenly disconnecting and breaking tunnels without warning. I do have several old Android devices just laying around so maybe I can just plug them in running the router sitting on my home network all day. Seems like a good use of old equipment to contribute to the network.
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